khóa HƯỚNG DẪN VIẾT LUẬN
NỘP HỒ SƠ DU HỌC MỸ

Một trong những bí quyết thành công của bộ hồ sơ du học Mỹ chính là bài luận hay và thuyết phục. Hãy tham gia chương trình hướng dẫn viết luận nộp hồ sơ du học Mỹ của AMVNX để nắm chắc 100% tỉ lệ thành công vào các trường đại học mơ ước!

CÁC DẠNG BÀI LUẬN

Bài luận chính

Common App Essay

bài luận hệ thống
trường California

UCAS Personal Statement

Bài luận phụ

Supplemental College Essay

Nội dung chương trình

Lên Ý Tưởng

Giảng viên cùng học sinh tìm ra ý tưởng về chủ đề và nội dung bài luận nhằm thể hiện  cá tính học sinh, giúp các em gây ấn tượng với đại diện tuyển sinh của trường ngay từ những phần mở đầu.

Lập dàn ý

Trước khi bắt đầu viết, giảng viên sẽ cùng với học sinh lập dàn ý để có một cái nhìn tổng thể về bài viết và nội dung từng đoạn trong bài.

Viết bản nháp

Để tạo ra một bài luận ấn tượng thì bước đóng góp lớn là những bản nháp, trong giai đoạn này giảng viên sẽ đồng hành cùng học sinh gợi mở thêm ý tưởng và chỉnh sửa bản nháp ngày một hoàn thiện hơn.

Kiểm tra và chỉnh sửa

Khi học sinh đã hoàn thiện bản nháp cuối cùng, giảng viên sẽ cùng học sinh kiểm tra cẩn thận lỗi ngữ pháp, lỗi chính tả, cách lựa chọn từ ngữ và câu văn. Giảng viên thêm ý tưởng cho phần kết luận nhằm giúp học sinh gây ấn tượng với hội đồng tuyển sinh.

Giảng viên

100% giảng viên người Mỹ đã hỗ trợ hàng nghìn học sinh trúng tuyển vào các trường đại học hàng đầu nước Mỹ
Cô Mari Hernandez

Từng nhận học bổng toàn phần và tốt nghiệp loại Giỏi trường đại học California – Berkeley (#22 NU). Cô đã có 8 năm kinh nghiệm hướng dẫn viết luận nâng cao và hỗ trợ học sinh nộp hồ sơ thành công vào các trường đại học hàng đầu nước Mỹ như Cornell, Brown, Boston College, v.v… 100% học sinh hoàn thành lớp học đều có bài luận ấn tượng, trong đó có 2 học sinh được học bổng toàn phần của trường đại học Columbia và Yale thuộc khối Ivy League danh giá.

MẪU BÀI LUẬN TRƯỚC VÀ SAU CHỈNH SỬA

Sau mỗi buổi học, giảng viên sẽ có một bản báo cáo ghi lại quá trình tiến bộ của học sinh, những gì các em cần sửa và giải pháp để bài luận ngày một hay và thuyết phục hơn.
  • Đoạn Văn Gốc
  • Đoạn Văn Đã Chỉnh Sửa
  • Most of my life, I’ve attended international schools. For the longest time, I thought my enrollment at these schools was enough to turn me into a top student and make me a well-rounded individual. In Vietnam, these international schools, which place greater emphasis on English and follow American standards, have always been recognized as providing the best possible education in Vietnam. Yet, when I eventually competed against public school students in ninth grade, I realized that I was behind because I had been complacent about school. The opportunities had been in front of me, but I had yet to take advantage of them.

    Ninth grade is a stressful year for Vietnamese students because it culminates in a year-end exam that determines which high school each student qualifies to attend. It’s similar in concept to the SAT and just as important. Students study in extra afterschool and weekend prep classes throughout ninth grade as they prepare for the exam. As a student at an international school planning to study abroad, I wouldn’t have to take the exam. My father, however, wanted me to test my current level by preparing for it anyways. I was confident that I was going to do better than public school students. It wasn’t until an assessment meant to determine which prep class fit my level that I realized just how far ahead of me my public school peers were. I was shocked that they performed better than me in two out of the three exams: math and literature. Having access to the best educational opportunities hadn’t turned me into the best student.

    I wondered whether I would be successful in America if I couldn’t even outperform students on Vietnamese exams. I felt overwhelmed with stress, but I knew what I needed to do to prepare myself. I wasn’t excited to participate in special prep classes, but I didn’t waste the opportunity. Truly motivated to improve myself in these classes, I found myself doing just that. I improved. Day by day, I put all my effort into my lessons. By the end of it all, I had success on the high school entrance exam and learned the importance of motivation in determining outcomes. I was confident that I would find success in America so long as I didn’t waste any opportunity.

    My resolve to change my approach to challenges and opportunities alike couldn’t have come at a better time. As I prepared to move abroad to America for high school, I knew I was ready to be the best me I could be. I know I’ve been blessed to have access to many advantages in life that my peers in Vietnam only dream of, so I’ve become a more active participant in and out of the classroom since arriving in Worcester. Worcester Academy offers a variety of advanced courses such as Multivariable Calculus and Organic Chemistry, and I wanted to take as many of them as possible. Otherwise, I would just be wasting the academic opportunities offered by my school. Thanks to this goal, I was able to challenge myself with many advanced courses as an upperclassman. I tried not only to understand and remember the scientific concepts and procedures I learned but also to utilize all of the courses’ resources to gain laboratory experience, something Vietnamese science courses didn’t offer. In Math classes, I always tried to internalize concepts by doing every practice problem provided by my textbooks and teachers.

    My encounter with public school students drove me to realize the importance of taking advantage of the opportunities I have in life. I understood that I didn’t fully take advantage of the amazing facilities and teachers that my international school provided. Instead, I had been complacent. I have since changed my attitude towards opportunities, trying to make the most out of my academic courses and to participate in as many extracurricular activities as possible.

Most of my life, I’ve attended international schools. For the longest time, I thought my enrollment at these schools was enough to turn me into a top student and make me a well-rounded individual. In Vietnam, these international schools, which place greater emphasis on English and follow American standards, have always been recognized as providing the best possible education in Vietnam. Yet, when I eventually competed against public school students in ninth grade, I realized that I was behind because I had been complacent about school. The opportunities had been in front of me, but I had yet to take advantage of them.

Ninth grade is a stressful year for Vietnamese students because it culminates in a year-end exam that determines which high school each student qualifies to attend. It’s similar in concept to the SAT and just as important. Students study in extra afterschool and weekend prep classes throughout ninth grade as they prepare for the exam. As a student at an international school planning to study abroad, I wouldn’t have to take the exam. My father, however, wanted me to test my current level by preparing for it anyways. I was confident that I was going to do better than public school students. It wasn’t until an assessment meant to determine which prep class fit my level that I realized just how far ahead of me my public school peers were. I was shocked that they performed better than me in two out of the three exams: math and literature. Having access to the best educational opportunities hadn’t turned me into the best student.

I wondered whether I would be successful in America if I couldn’t even outperform students on Vietnamese exams. I felt overwhelmed with stress, but I knew what I needed to do to prepare myself. I wasn’t excited to participate in special prep classes, but I didn’t waste the opportunity. Truly motivated to improve myself in these classes, I found myself doing just that. I improved. Day by day, I put all my effort into my lessons. By the end of it all, I had success on the high school entrance exam and learned the importance of motivation in determining outcomes. I was confident that I would find success in America so long as I didn’t waste any opportunity.

My resolve to change my approach to challenges and opportunities alike couldn’t have come at a better time. As I prepared to move abroad to America for high school, I knew I was ready to be the best me I could be. I know I’ve been blessed to have access to many advantages in life that my peers in Vietnam only dream of, so I’ve become a more active participant in and out of the classroom since arriving in Worcester. Worcester Academy offers a variety of advanced courses such as Multivariable Calculus and Organic Chemistry, and I wanted to take as many of them as possible. Otherwise, I would just be wasting the academic opportunities offered by my school. Thanks to this goal, I was able to challenge myself with many advanced courses as an upperclassman. I tried not only to understand and remember the scientific concepts and procedures I learned but also to utilize all of the courses’ resources to gain laboratory experience, something Vietnamese science courses didn’t offer. In Math classes, I always tried to internalize concepts by doing every practice problem provided by my textbooks and teachers.

My encounter with public school students drove me to realize the importance of taking advantage of the opportunities I have in life. I understood that I didn’t fully take advantage of the amazing facilities and teachers that my international school provided. Instead, I had been complacent. I have since changed my attitude towards opportunities, trying to make the most out of my academic courses and to participate in as many extracurricular activities as possible.

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